Tag Archives: summer flowers

Who are flowers for?

Who are flowers for?

 

Flowers are for us to admire – right?

 

Well absolutely yes they are, but flowers aren’t just for us, many of today’s modern blooms however are created primarily to please the human eye – but are we forgetting who flowers are really for?

 

What would butterflies think v1
Let’s take you back a few hundreds of millions of years to when flowers began. The plants that survived and thrived were those that evolved the best strategy to reproduce effectively. The emergence of flowers and nectar allowed plants to attract insects and this improved the efficiency of the pollination process and allowed plants to proliferate.

 

Flowers evolved over millions of years to attract the best pollinating insects or they formed a symbiotic relationship with certain types of insect to develop a really efficient reproductive cycle. It created a win-win situation whereby flowers provided the insect with much needed food and the insects took the pollen and redistributed it.

Now Horticulture has thrown a ‘spanner in the works’

 

For millions of years this system has worked well and then humans discovered how we could ‘breed’ bigger and better flowers. Careful selection and cross pollinating meant we could create more colourful blooms. We could develop flowers with modified and elaborate petals and stamens and produce blooms in all the colours of the rainbow. Horticulture also developed the ability to create more bountiful crops and fruits.  We also managed to increase the range and variety of many hundreds of species of plants and thereby widen the available larder for many pollinating insects.

 

However, a whole industry has evolved to create flowering plants whose appeal and use to insects is pretty limited but to us humans they look spectacular!

These plants produce many flowers over long periods of time, often the flowers are bred to be larger and more elaborate and the colour combinations created are really quite astonishing.

 

Are these really flowers though?

 

1390282_29761392 overly bred rose

If a bee cannot recognise this as a flower….aren’t we missing the point?

 

These plants have been cross bred over time to create blooms that could never be created in nature. The stamens and petals are so modified, insects can’t access the nectar or transfer the pollen. The plant cannot reproduce itself. In fact many of these plants are sterile and so cannot reproduce without human interference.

 

Thus if the flower produced is incapable of performing the function for which it originally evolved – is it really a flower?

Now you may argue that it doesn’t really matter. These plants can’t cross pollinate with other plants and what’s the harm in planting them in the garden.  Flip that thought process round and ask what’s the good of planting them in the garden either.

 

The problem arises if too many highly developed flowers appear in domestic gardens – bees and butterflies would expend so much energy trying to find food.  They will have less food to store and this reduces their ability to survive the winters.

If we all try to do just a little bit…

 

Domestic gardens are becoming far more important to native wildlife than ever before. Do you really want to fill your gardens with plants that cannot provide any food for butterflies or bees?

 

All that is required is a little more thought before you buy any plants. If you go to a garden centre to buy your plants, have a look at the displays.  Do you see any insects flying around (now the Garden Centre could have sprayed the plants), but with that concentration of plants in flower, you would surely expect to see some bees buzzing around.

 

Flowers image B Roslett

image B Roslett

 

Bees see in Ultraviolet, so what we admire in a flower is not actually what attracts the bees to it. It is unlikely that commercial plant breeders check the UV look of the flowers in development to see how and whether a bee is attracted to it and it wouldn’t be commercially viable to do so.

It is quite possible therefore, what you see as a spectacular flower is totally unrecognisable to a bee or butterfly.

 

A simple check on the plant label will normally tell you whether a plant is good for bees.

 

We all love to fill our houses with beautiful things. However, you wouldn’t buy a kettle that didn’t boil water just because it looked nice. Good design is about form AND function.

So before you buy your plants for the garden, think what benefits this plant can bring to your garden.

 

 

Not sure which plants are best for bees?

All our designs use insect friendly flowers as much as possible, why not have a browse?

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 8

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 8

My garden isn’t peaceful or quiet

 

It would be lovely for buyers to step out into your garden and only hear the birds singing away in the trees, lucky for some eh? So if your garden is not the peaceful tranquil oasis you would like, what can you do to minimise the impact of traffic noise or at least stop prospective buyers noticing it too much?

 

How to reduce the impact of noise around your garden

 

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1: Try to avoid booking viewings at the noisiest times

Ok, it’s not really a garden tip, but it’s a pretty obvious and easy solution – so instruct the Agent to avoid certain times of the day for showing buyers around.

 

2: Visually hide what’s causing the most noise

If we can see what’s making the noise as well as hear it, we will pay more attention to the noise. Tall planting will be required to block out this view, rather than going out and spending lots of money on large plants or new fencing, see if any tall plants can be moved from elsewhere in the garden. Plant noisy plants i.e ones that rustle in the wind, not only will this distract you from the noise, foliage disrupts the sound waves thus helping to muffle the volume a little.

 

3: Humans have 5 senses – use all of them

Cotinus and Cardoon 2

Use strong bold shapes and colours

Rhododendron Luteum flowers

Rhododendron Luteum – an amazing scent in Spring

This is all a distraction technique, the external noise will hit the ears of your buyers – so we need to hit them with sensory input from all other 4 senses equally hard, so any noise is not so prominent.

The two senses to concentrate on are sight and smell. Create a real visual impact as they step into the garden, (it doesn’t have to mean the whole garden – just the first area the buyers will see). Use height, movement (grasses are cheap and very DSCF8006useful plants for noisy ‘swishing’ sounds) and colours to capture their interest. Just a note, use 2-3 colours it will have more impact than including every possible colour.

Secondly SCENT – pack the area full of lovely smells. Then add plants that people will love to touch, you can also add some nice noise – be careful it’s not irritating, some windchimes are awful but some are more relaxing. You could be more inventive …and have some bird song music playing! Lastly, taste, how about a couple of pots packed with strawberry plants within easy picking distance…? 

 

You are in the process of SELLING the house don’t forget and the message you want them to remember is how lovely the garden is, not how noisy.

 

Read also: 

You’ve some prospective buyers arriving soon:

If you have prospective buyers due to arrive, make sure the front garden create the best first impression – after all it’s usually the first thing they see when they arrive.

What to do if your garden is not quite up to scratch:

We all want to maximise the value of our homes when selling – without having to spend a lot of money in the process.

Oh, there is no view – sorry!

Buyers will always look out of the window to see ‘the view’ – but if your view is not the most appealing, what can you do? 

Yep – that’s exactly how big the garden is!

We cannot escape the garden boundaries, however they highlight to the limits of the space people are looking to move into. So if you have a small garden and your are surrounded by fences, is there any way to minimise the negative impact of lots of fencing and enhance your garden more?

I’m not the world’s keenest gardener!

Your garden can be one of your best sales assets, although an unloved garden is unlikely to put off an interested buyer, it is not going to encourage them to bid up the price either!

Ah yes, we don’t use that bit of the garden – at all!

Don’t let the garden work against your sale.  Buyers will spot all the tricky bits of the garden before they see the nice bits…so you need to have a plan to disguise the difficult bits better!

Well, the neighbours are really quite lovely…(most of the time)

Very few of us live in splendid isolation, we all have neighbours. Now that is all well and good, but will the neighbours garden style help or hinder your sale!

 

If you would like some more design advice for your garden…

Garden Design for Beginners

Mini-Makeovers

Solve even more Garden Problems

visit

back to home

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 7

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 7

The garden is a really awkward shape

 

Many gardens have ‘dead space’ areas that are awkward shapes and they usually end up as dumping grounds for all your garden stuff or your garden is a really difficult shape to have a garden at all – so how can the garden help in selling your home?

 

Selling is about emphasising the good whilst making sure the not so good is less noticeable.

design-1500-px

How to make the most of your garden 

 

1: Turn negative into positive

hiding bins behind trellis

There a 3 wheelie bins here – but do you really notice them?

This means, if you have a dud area, rather than try to hide it, put something there that is good to look at, then the buyers will notice that and not what it’s hiding. A classic example is with the bins. We all have them, and we all try to stuff them into a corner where we hope noone will notice…but they do. So a very simple solution is a free standing trellis, a couple of posts, a trellis panel and some annual climbers will create something pretty to look at.

 

 

2: You ‘control’ what the buyer sees

ten pin bowling in yellows

This has visual impact

It’s a simple principle, you place something really noticeable in front of the area you don’t want them to notice. So put some chairs and a table out with the parasol up, put a tablecloth on the table. Add a colourful plant pot on their too.  Or you make a feature of the best area of the garden so the rest is not so noticeable, i.e clump all your pots together to create a real impact – have some tall planting or raise pots off the ground. Visually it becomes a large feature in the garden and the bit buyers are most likely to remember.

 

3: Stop them seeing all the garden at once

Human eyes follow lines, in an odd shaped garden this means the eye follow the lines and notices all the odd shaped bits easily. So if we break up the lines and create new shapes your buyers eyes follow the lines of the nice shapes you create.

narrow garden line drawingThis is a really long and narrow garden, you view a long straight road with a shed at the end and nothing stops it in between.

First we make the eye move left and right by creating a couple of beds on either side.

narrow garden - ready for planting

A couple of curved beds make a big difference

Then we stop the eye getting to the end of the garden by the use of trellis. Before a buyer comes to visit, you mow the lawn following the contours of the new curve, the curvy stripes all help to make eyes wander left and right this will make the garden feel wider than it is.

  

narrow garden - feather planting

Light airy planting and tall trellis stops the view all the way to the end.

Read also: 

You’ve some prospective buyers arriving soon:

If you have prospective buyers due to arrive, make sure the front garden create the best first impression – after all it’s usually the first thing they see when they arrive.

What to do if your garden is not quite up to scratch:

We all want to maximise the value of our homes when selling – without having to spend a lot of money in the process.

Oh, there is no view – sorry!

Buyers will always look out of the window to see ‘the view’ – but if your view is not the most appealing, what can you do? 

Yep – that’s exactly how big the garden is!

We cannot escape the garden boundaries, however they highlight to the limits of the space people are looking to move into. So if you have a small garden and your are surrounded by fences, is there any way to minimise the negative impact of lots of fencing and enhance your garden more?

I’m not the world’s keenest gardener!

Your garden can be one of your best sales assets, although an unloved garden is unlikely to put off an interested buyer, it is not going to encourage them to bid up the price either!

Also what can you do if the garden is not the house’s best asset!

We can’t change the environment outside the garden, but we can lessen the negative impact on the garden. Here’s how

Well, the neighbours are really quite lovely…(most of the time)

Very few of us live in splendid isolation, we all have neighbours. Now that is all well and good, but will the neighbours garden style help or hinder your sale!

 

If you would like some more design advice for your garden…

Garden Design for Beginners

Mini-Makeovers

Solve even more Garden Problems

visit

back to home

 

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 6

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 6

The garden is a little unloved…!

 

If your garden is a little unloved you are not making the most of one of your properties biggest selling features, it won’t probably put people off buying the house, but it won’t help get you the best sale price either.

 

What message are you sending the prospective buyer?

 

This garden is so much work and effort to keep on top of…

Your garden isn’t a nice place to be – so there is no point in using it?

Are they worried there may be problems that are hidden by the mess?

Whatever it is, the garden will certainly not be helping the sale – so you have to get your hands dirty and start to sort things out….but where to start?

design-1500-px

Top Tips to get your garden looking a little bit more loved

 

1: Paths and Patios

path

Keep these edges neat and straight.

You don’t need to have a perfect patio or path, just a weed free one with neat edges. So you may need to use weedkiller (spray on a calm day to prevent partially killing your garden plants too) to clear the path weeds. Make sure the edges between borders or the lawn and your patio/path are neat. If they are not use an edging spade to neaten them up. Make sure as your buyers walk outside on the patio or down any path – they are not going to get swiped by overhanging branches or attacked by that long bramble shoot!

 

2: Flower Beds and Borders

border clean up

Stopping flopping and a neat edge make a real difference

They are probably rather weed infested, so you are going to have to do some clearing up. Try to remove roots as well as leaves as much as possible. To keep the ground weed free for as long as possible, add a mulch, this could be either bark chippings or a ground conditioner. Spread it really thickly over the weeded soil and around the base of your plants.

If you have some unruly plants that flop onto the path – don’t cut them back it is better to tie them up and put in plant supports. Not only will this keep the garden looking more green and abundant, you will avoid creating large bare patches or showing off stumpy plants.

 

 3: Make a feature of something!

It sounds a little counterproductive, if you don’t think your garden is up to much, but a little effort in one area after you have tidied up can make a world of difference.

Looking at the images below, this garden isn’t totally unloved, but it doesn’t say garden lover either. Once you remove the unnecessary, you can see what you have, and the feature in this garden is the pergola, but at present it is dominated by the shed and the yew.

Garden_Shed_with_Yew_Tree_-_geograph.org

In the last image, the shed and pergola work together, the bright pink flowers are complimented and contrasted by the cream of the shed and the dark green of the yew. A few large plants have been added (which you could put in pots to take with you when you move) then enclose the area and says – look at this isn’t this bit lovely!

 

shed planted

 

Read also: 

You’ve some prospective buyers arriving soon:

If you have prospective buyers due to arrive, make sure the front garden creates the best first impression. It’s usually the first thing they see when they arrive.

What to do if your garden is not quite up to scratch:

Maximise the value of our homes when selling – without having to spend a lot of money in the process.

Oh, there is no view – sorry!

Buyers will always look out of the window – but if your view is not the most appealing, what can you do? 

Yep – that’s exactly how big the garden is!

We cannot escape the garden boundaries, however they highlight to the limits of the garden. In a small garden is there any way to minimise the negative impact of lots of fencing and showcase the garden more?

Also what can you do if the garden is not the house’s best asset!

We can’t change the environment outside the garden, but we can lessen the negative impact on the garden. Here’s how

Ah yes, we don’t use that bit of the garden – at all!

Don’t let the garden work against your sale.  Buyers will spot all the tricky bits of the garden, so you need to have a plan to disguise the difficult bits better!

Well, the neighbours are really quite lovely…(most of the time)

Very few of us live in splendid isolation, we all have neighbours. Now that is all well and good, but will the neighbours garden style help or hinder your sale!

 

If you would like some more design advice for your garden…

Garden Design for Beginners

Mini-Makeovers

Solve even more Garden Problems

visit

back to home

 

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 5

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 5

I have a boring view or there is no view!

 

Whilst we would love to look out of the window and see rolling hills and green fields many of our domestic views are a little less inspiring! You can make a very boring view a whole lot more interesting – but you need to be inventive.

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How to make your garden view more interesting…

 

1: Create your own ‘view’

window painting

Who said pictures can only go on inside walls?

Humans love looking at things, so if the outside of the window is awful, make something nice to look at. Use bright colours or bold designs to make it eye catching. Make sure when you are standing up, you can see the new view through the window. Here an outdoor canvas has been attached to the wall.

 

 

2: Create a little garden to look at

window and plants

Your own little ‘vertical’ garden!

Add shelves outside and place something pretty to look at on them. Again make sure it is visible when you stand up and look through the window. If you are using plants, it can be hard to water up high, so cheat, use a mixture of evergreen plants that are drought tolerant, (ivy is good) and add in some artificial flowers – tastefully of course! If you are putting pots or heavy objects on the shelves – attach them securely to the shelf to prevent anything being blown off.

 

 

3: Use movement to hide the view

window and grass

It’s hard to get movement in a picture, but hopefully you get the drift!

If the ugly view is not yours and you can’t attach anything to it, then the best way to disguise it is to use something that moves. Place a tall pot outside the window, weight it down securely and plant a tall grass in it. The stems of the grass will then waft in any breeze, hiding what’s behind.

This can also be done with a window box, you want light airy plants that will sway rather than solid greenery.

 

 

 

If you cannot place anything outside the window, then rather than resort to a dense net curtain, create something nice inside the window to catch the eye, maybe a vase filled with fairy lights, hang light catching baubles or mirrored balls in front of the window or some pot plants on your windowsill (make them tall plants though).  It’s all about saying ‘Look at this not stare at that!’ – the home selling equivalent to a little make up and a good foundation.

 

Read also: 

You’ve some prospective buyers arriving soon:

If you have prospective buyers due to arrive, make sure the front garden create the best first impression – after all it’s usually the first thing they see when they arrive.

What to do if your garden is not quite up to scratch:

We all want to maximise the value of our homes when selling – without having to spend a lot of money in the process.

Yep – that’s exactly how big the garden is!

We cannot escape the garden boundaries, however they highlight to the limits of the space people are looking to move into. So if you have a small garden and your are surrounded by fences, is there any way to minimise the negative impact of lots of fencing and enhance your garden more?

I’m not the world’s keenest gardener!

Your garden can be one of your best sales assets, although an unloved garden is unlikely to put off an interested buyer, it is not going to encourage them to bid up the price either!

Also what can you do if the garden is not the house’s best asset!

We can’t change the environment outside the garden, but we can lessen the negative impact on the garden. Here’s how

Ah yes, we don’t use that bit of the garden – at all!

Don’t let the garden work against your sale.  Buyers will spot all the tricky bits of the garden before they see the nice bits…so you need to have a plan to disguise the difficult bits better!

Well, the neighbours are really quite lovely…(most of the time)

Very few of us live in splendid isolation, we all have neighbours. Now that is all well and good, but will the neighbours garden style help or hinder your sale!

 

If you would like some more design advice for your garden…

Garden Design for Beginners

Mini-Makeovers

Solve even more Garden Problems

visit

back to home

 

 

 

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 4

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 4

There is a distinct lack of privacy!

 

Most modern gardens are overlooked by neighbouring windows, and it can be quite a turn off for prospective buyers -we would all love our gardens to be totally private, but if they are not, what can you do to minimise the impact of the neighbours windows.

Easy ways to make your garden more private!

 

1: Strategic Shrubs!

grass screen

And you can take them with you when you move

Blocking the neighbours view of your garden does not require tall fences or huge hedges -you just end up blocking out your own light instead. The area you would like to be most private is usually where you sit in the evening, so sit there and see which windows overlook that place. A strategically placed shrub should screen that window.  If you don’t have a shrub to hand or can’t move any from elsewhere in the garden, consider tall pot and plant a tall grass in it. Grasses are great for cheap screening, they are fast growing, cheap to buy, they don’t require much water and will still look good – so they work really well if you aren’t good at remembering to water!

 

2: Make an area of the garden really eye-catching

Your buyers will tend to notice this first, rather than all the windows – make it tall and dramatic and put it in a spot so that it is the first thing they see when stepping into your garden.

 

3: Invest in a large parasol or sail awning

A strategically placed parasol will hide a multitude of unwanted views. Always have the parasol or sail ‘up’ when you have a house viewing.

 

overlooked - line drawing

OK it’s a new garden, but there’s no hiding from the neighbours.

Big bright planting and a well placed parasol and the neighbours seem a little less ‘neighbourly’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read also: 

You’ve some prospective buyers arriving soon:

If you have prospective buyers due to arrive, make sure the front garden create the best first impression – after all it’s usually the first thing they see when they arrive.

What to do if your garden is not quite up to scratch:

We all want to maximise the value of our homes when selling – without having to spend a lot of money in the process.

Oh, there is no view – sorry!

Buyers will always look out of the window to see ‘the view’ – but if your view is not the most appealing, what can you do? 

Yep – that’s exactly how big the garden is!

We cannot escape the garden boundaries, however they highlight to the limits of the space people are looking to move into. So if you have a small garden and your are surrounded by fences, is there any way to minimise the negative impact of lots of fencing and enhance your garden more?

I’m not the world’s keenest gardener!

Your garden can be one of your best sales assets, although an unloved garden is unlikely to put off an interested buyer, it is not going to encourage them to bid up the price either!

Also what can you do if the garden is not the house’s best asset!

We can’t change the environment outside the garden, but we can lessen the negative impact on the garden. Here’s how

Ah yes, we don’t use that bit of the garden – at all!

Don’t let the garden work against your sale.  Buyers will spot all the tricky bits of the garden before they see the nice bits…so you need to have a plan to disguise the difficult bits better!

 

If you would like some more design advice for your garden…

Garden Design for Beginners

Mini-Makeovers

Solve even more Garden Problems

visit

back to home

 

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 3

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 3

Creating a more interesting garden – cheaply!

 

OK, you are trying to sell your home and you think the garden is looking a little dull and uninteresting – it won’t stop you selling your home, but it won’t help to encourage a buyer to buy either!

How to make your garden more interesting…

 

1: Concentrate your efforts on one area

2015-07-03 12.21.32

It’s OK but…..

little view

what catches your eye now?

Which is the first window any buyer will look through to view your garden, which part of the garden is framed by the window? That is the area you concentrate on. You need to pack this ‘view’ with nice stuff to look at – and it doesn’t mean buying loads of plants to fill this space or spending lots of money.  Look at the plants in the garden, would it be better to dig and move some together to create a spectacular border rather than have all the plants dotted around the edges.

 

2: Make what you have more interesting

Put cushions on your patio chairs and a tablecloth on the table, make it bright and cheerful. If you have pots dotted around the garden, bring them together in one place near where people would sit for more impact. 

 

3: Add some colour to the garden

cd369101045b5e8cdb2b133cd325b58d windmills

Well it’s not a boring green hedge is it?

This doesn’t mean added bucket loads of garish coloured plants all over the place, you need a plan!  If the garden is rather shaded then use white flowers to liven up darker corners. Put them in pots so you can move the flowers into darker corners for viewings and then back to the sunshine afterwards. But stick to one colour of flower only, it can be different shades. There is more impact with a single block of colour. Avoid blues as they don’t really stand out.

You can also use objects to inject colour, so maybe lantern lights or bunting. Hang mirrored balls from trees to catch the light or use mirrors to reflect light and brighten dark spaces. You want your buyer to remember something positive about the garden rather than nothing at all!

 

plotting-shed-6 

Read also: 

You’ve some prospective buyers arriving soon:

If you have prospective buyers due to arrive, make sure the front garden create the best first impression – after all it’s usually the first thing they see when they arrive.

Oh, there is no view – sorry!

Buyers will always look out of the window to see ‘the view’ – but if your view is not the most appealing, what can you do? 

Yep – that’s exactly how big the garden is!

We cannot escape the garden boundaries, however they highlight to the limits of the space people are looking to move into. So if you have a small garden and your are surrounded by fences, is there any way to minimise the negative impact of lots of fencing and enhance your garden more?

I’m not the world’s keenest gardener!

Your garden can be one of your best sales assets, although an unloved garden is unlikely to put off an interested buyer, it is not going to encourage them to bid up the price either!

Also what can you do if the garden is not the house’s best asset!

We can’t change the environment outside the garden, but we can lessen the negative impact on the garden. Here’s how

Ah yes, we don’t use that bit of the garden – at all!

Don’t let the garden work against your sale.  Buyers will spot all the tricky bits of the garden before they see the nice bits…so you need to have a plan to disguise the difficult bits better!

Well, the neighbours are really quite lovely…(most of the time)

Very few of us live in splendid isolation, we all have neighbours. Now that is all well and good, but will the neighbours garden style help or hinder your sale!

 

If you would like some more design advice for your garden…

Garden Design for Beginners

Mini-Makeovers

Solve even more Garden Problems

visit

back to home

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 2

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 2

Making your garden fences less obvious!

 

Most gardens have fences but all too often when you view a garden all you see is fence, fence and more fence.  Also, many gardens are planted with borders centrifuged around the edges, which only emphasises the fences and won’t make your garden an interesting place to sit.

So how do you show off your garden when selling your home if it is surrounded by very obvious fences – without spending loads of money!

 design-1500-px

The basic principle is to draw your buyer’s eye to something YOU WANT THEM TO NOTICE. You ‘guide’ their view of your garden to the best bit and make those really positive. That’s the bit they will remember about your garden.

Top Tips for sorting out the fences!

 

Simons Garden (4)

The grass look greener with a black fence too!

Simons Garden before

An unpainted garden room

1: Paint the fence  

Good colours for fencing are black, silver, cream and sage/pale green. Avoid browns, reds or some of the really bright shades of fence paint.

 

 

 

 

2: Break up the upper fence line

IMG_3430

No hiding the fence here!

fence and grasses planting

Less fence on show is much better

This means at some point along the line of the fence have something that grows taller than the fence, your eye follows straight lines, so what you are doing is distract the buyers eye to notice the stuff in front of the fence rather than just notice the fence!

 

 

 

 

3: Create 1 or 2 big planting areas

You want your buyer to notice the stuff you want them too, so it’s best to create fewer big noticeable borders rather than centrifuge the plants you have around the edges of the garden.

File 01-07-2015 11 50 11 2015-07-01 11_13_28

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this drawing, the lawn has been reshaped and all the planting moved to two borders. This has created a nice area to sit. A post and rope pergola has been added to lift the fence line for more privacy as well as helping disguise the verge, pavement and road outside. A really good tip for helping your buyers look at the bit you want is when you mow the grass, mow the stripes toward your focal point it helps guide the buyer’s eye to what you want them to notice. Lastly, the grass now goes to the edge of the fence which helps keep it looking as large as possible.

 

So very little money spent but a little effort digging can easily make your garden look more interesting.

 

Read also: 

You’ve some prospective buyers arriving soon:

If you have prospective buyers due to arrive, make sure the front garden create the best first impression – after all it’s usually the first thing they see when they arrive.

What to do if your garden is not quite up to scratch:

We all want to maximise the value of our homes when selling – without having to spend a lot of money in the process.

Oh, there is no view – sorry!

Buyers will always look out of the window to see ‘the view’ – but if your view is not the most appealing, what can you do? 

I’m not the world’s keenest gardener!

Your garden can be one of your best sales assets, although an unloved garden is unlikely to put off an interested buyer, it is not going to encourage them to bid up the price either!

Also what can you do if the garden is not the house’s best asset!

We can’t change the environment outside the garden, but we can lessen the negative impact on the garden. Here’s how

Ah yes, we don’t use that bit of the garden – at all!

Don’t let the garden work against your sale.  Buyers will spot all the tricky bits of the garden before they see the nice bits…so you need to have a plan to disguise the difficult bits better!

Well, the neighbours are really quite lovely…(most of the time)

Very few of us live in splendid isolation, we all have neighbours. Now that is all well and good, but will the neighbours garden style help or hinder your sale!

 

If you would like some more design advice for your garden…

Garden Design for Beginners

Mini-Makeovers

Solve even more Garden Problems

visit

back to home

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 1

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 1

Does your garden help to sell your home?

 

Look out of a window at your garden, shut your eyes, then open them again…what is the first thing to catch your eye..

 

If it’s something really pretty, eyecatching or interesting that’s great… but what if it’s not? 

More importantly what will prospective buyers see?

 

The neighbours windows overlooking your garden…

or will it be the fences, more fences and the garden boundaries,

perhaps they see you don’t like your garden much?

Or that you can’t keep on top of it

or perhaps there’s nothing much for them to see at all…

So will your garden help or hinder your sale?

 

Remember you are SELLING your home, not sitting passively in a corner waiting for someone to buy it and there’s lots you can do to ENCOURAGE THE SALE.

The basic principle is to draw your buyer’s eye to something YOU WANT THEM TO NOTICE. You ‘guide’ their view of your garden to the best bits and make those really positive. That’s the bit they will remember about your garden.

We have some top tips to help your garden help you sell your home, each guide deals with a specific problem, and shows simple easy (and inexpensive) ways to ensure your garden helps to sell your home.

speedy spruce

button dull button no privacy button fences button ugly view button unloved button awkward shape button - not peaceful

How your garden helps sell your home – Speedy Spruce Up!

How your garden helps to sell your home

 

Look out of the window to your garden, shut your eyes, then open them again…what is the first thing to catch your eye..

 

If it’s something really pretty, eyecatching or interesting that’s great… but what if it’s not? 

What will your prospective buyers see?

 

Getting your garden to work for you isn’t tricky AND you don’t need to spend lots of money either. So what to do if you haven’t much time before someone comes to view your home?

TOP TIPS for a Speedy Spruce Up!

 

The Lawn: 

Mow the lawn every week without fail – BUT DON’T CUT IT TOO SHORT. It will keep the grass looking it’s best. If you haven’t time for a mow, trim the lawn edges quickly, it really smartens things up. Lastly make sure the edge between path/patio and lawn is really neat.

 

 

front garden - bedding can look nice

The planting may not be everyone’s cup of tea – but it creates a good first impression

Sweep the Paths and Patio:

You hoover the house….well same principle outside!

 

 

 

Tidy up:

Put garden toys away in a shed, bring the washing in, put bins out of sight if poss. If there are old pots or pots with dead plants – get rid of them, having nothing is better than looking at dead plants or empty pots!

 

 

Aa_montbretia

Use plant supports to keep edges neat

Stop the Flop!:

If you have plants that flop over a path or plants that get in the way, tie them back (don’t chop them down – unless it’s absolutely necessary). Plants that flop or are too overgrown will make your garden look smaller than it really is – which won’t help the sale!

 

 

Put the patio table and chairs out: 

summer-spring-garden-design-terrace-patio-layout-small-apartment-backyard-inspiration-idea-flower-setting-miniature-garden-colorful-floral-ideas-3

Very welcoming isn’t it?

This gives more of an impression the garden is nice to sit in, make sure the furniture is clean and not tatty looking. Put a pot plant of happy flowers on the table (something like geraniums for example). You are saying to buyers this is a lovely place to sit and enjoy the outside!

 

 

 

Create a focal point: 

Container_garden_on_front_porch

Happy flowers raised up are more eye catching

This doesn’t mean spending lots of money, but may involve a little moving stuff around.  If you have plants in pots, Group them together, site it so that it can be seen from the back window. Try if possible to have height variation, so use short medium and tall plants. If the plants aren’t tall, stand them on another upturned pot to get height.  

It doesn’t matter if the pots temporarily stand on the lawn or are placed on the patio, it’s all about creating an atmosphere in the garden so you can SELL your home.

Read also: 

You’ve some prospective buyers arriving soon:

If you have prospective buyers due to arrive, make sure the front garden create the best first impression – after all it’s usually the first thing they see when they arrive.

What to do if your garden is not quite up to scratch:

We all want to maximise the value of our homes when selling – without having to spend a lot of money in the process.

Oh, there is no view – sorry!

 

Buyers will always look out of the window to see ‘the view’ – but if your view is not the most appealing, what can you do? 

Yep – that’s exactly how big the garden is!

We cannot escape the garden boundaries, however they highlight to the limits of the space people are looking to move into. So if you have a small garden and your are surrounded by fences, is there any way to minimise the negative impact of lots of fencing and enhance your garden more?

 

I’m not the world’s keenest gardener!

Your garden can be one of your best sales assets, although an unloved garden is unlikely to put off an interested buyer, it is not going to encourage them to bid up the price either!

 

Also what can you do if the garden is not the house’s best asset!

We can’t change the environment outside the garden, but we can lessen the negative impact on the garden. Here’s how

Ah yes, we don’t use that bit of the garden – at all!

Don’t let the garden work against your sale.  Buyers will spot all the tricky bits of the garden before they see the nice bits…so you need to have a plan to disguise the difficult bits better!

Well, the neighbours are really quite lovely…(most of the time)

Very few of us live in splendid isolation, we all have neighbours. Now that is all well and good, but will the neighbours garden style help or hinder your sale!

 

If you would like some more design advice for your garden…

Garden Design for Beginners

Mini-Makeovers

Solve even more Garden Problems

visit

back to home

 

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