Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 2

Good Garden Advice for Selling your Home – part 2

Making your garden fences less obvious!

 

Most gardens have fences but all too often when you view a garden all you see is fence, fence and more fence.  Also, many gardens are planted with borders centrifuged around the edges, which only emphasises the fences and won’t make your garden an interesting place to sit.

So how do you show off your garden when selling your home if it is surrounded by very obvious fences – without spending loads of money!

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The basic principle is to draw your buyer’s eye to something YOU WANT THEM TO NOTICE. You ‘guide’ their view of your garden to the best bit and make those really positive. That’s the bit they will remember about your garden.

Top Tips for sorting out the fences!

 

Simons Garden (4)

The grass look greener with a black fence too!

Simons Garden before

An unpainted garden room

1: Paint the fence  

Good colours for fencing are black, silver, cream and sage/pale green. Avoid browns, reds or some of the really bright shades of fence paint.

 

 

 

 

2: Break up the upper fence line

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No hiding the fence here!

fence and grasses planting

Less fence on show is much better

This means at some point along the line of the fence have something that grows taller than the fence, your eye follows straight lines, so what you are doing is distract the buyers eye to notice the stuff in front of the fence rather than just notice the fence!

 

 

 

 

3: Create 1 or 2 big planting areas

You want your buyer to notice the stuff you want them too, so it’s best to create fewer big noticeable borders rather than centrifuge the plants you have around the edges of the garden.

File 01-07-2015 11 50 11 2015-07-01 11_13_28

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In this drawing, the lawn has been reshaped and all the planting moved to two borders. This has created a nice area to sit. A post and rope pergola has been added to lift the fence line for more privacy as well as helping disguise the verge, pavement and road outside. A really good tip for helping your buyers look at the bit you want is when you mow the grass, mow the stripes toward your focal point it helps guide the buyer’s eye to what you want them to notice. Lastly, the grass now goes to the edge of the fence which helps keep it looking as large as possible.

 

So very little money spent but a little effort digging can easily make your garden look more interesting.

 

Read also: 

You’ve some prospective buyers arriving soon:

If you have prospective buyers due to arrive, make sure the front garden create the best first impression – after all it’s usually the first thing they see when they arrive.

What to do if your garden is not quite up to scratch:

We all want to maximise the value of our homes when selling – without having to spend a lot of money in the process.

Oh, there is no view – sorry!

Buyers will always look out of the window to see ‘the view’ – but if your view is not the most appealing, what can you do? 

I’m not the world’s keenest gardener!

Your garden can be one of your best sales assets, although an unloved garden is unlikely to put off an interested buyer, it is not going to encourage them to bid up the price either!

Also what can you do if the garden is not the house’s best asset!

We can’t change the environment outside the garden, but we can lessen the negative impact on the garden. Here’s how

Ah yes, we don’t use that bit of the garden – at all!

Don’t let the garden work against your sale.  Buyers will spot all the tricky bits of the garden before they see the nice bits…so you need to have a plan to disguise the difficult bits better!

Well, the neighbours are really quite lovely…(most of the time)

Very few of us live in splendid isolation, we all have neighbours. Now that is all well and good, but will the neighbours garden style help or hinder your sale!

 

If you would like some more design advice for your garden…

Garden Design for Beginners

Mini-Makeovers

Solve even more Garden Problems

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